Research Projects

Physically Embodied Educational Games

The Physically Embodied Educational Games project examines how can we effectively design physical embodiment and interaction into educational applications. Recent work on educational systems has shown the benefits of incorporating physicality, motion, and embodiment into designs. E.g., providing improved spatial recall and mental manipulation, increased engagement, greater positive feelings towards learning content, and enhanced collaboration. However, some studies have faced notable difficulty when attempting to utilize embodiment in their designs for improved learning outcomes due to weak mappings between physical action, embodied cognition, and learning concepts. To address these issues, we have created a design framework and physically embodied games to systematically examine how common physical design approaches (such as tangibles and augmented reality) may differ in learning outcomes and related educational factors.

Partners

NYU Game Innovation Lab

Selected Publications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members
Edward Melcer
Katherine Isbister

 

Affective Dimensions of Shape

In HCI, research linking dimensions of shape to phenomena such as emotion is fairly limited. Certain visual dimensions of form have been shown to express a wide range of emotions, but there is no unified understanding of which dimensions relate to which emotions. To address this gap, in the Affective Dimensions of Shape project we explore the relationship between shape and emotion, providing a taxonomy of affective shape dimensions and insight to how individuals embody emotion in form.

Partners

NYU Game Innovation Lab

Selected Publications

 

 

Members

Raquel Robinson
Katherine Isbister
Melanie Dickinson

All the Feels

The spectator experience has been researched in the context of public spaces, stadiums, and other venues. Technological advances have led to the rise of streaming platforms such as Twitch and YouTube in recent years. Additionally, we have had advances in the realm of game input, where there has been research enhancing the player experience through use of biometric feedback. However, no one has investigated the impact of the players’ biometric feedback on the spectator experience.
To investigate this, we are designing a tool called ‘All the Feels’, the purpose of which to incorporate biometric data into online gameplay streams. The tool displays heart rate and GSR (galvanic skin response) information to stream spectators, taken from the player in real-time, through the use of a commercially available wearable device. The tool also provides emotion labeling information input from existing auto-detection software that uses the player’s webcam. Notable results from a preliminary study show that the tool generated a greater spectator empathetic response in women rather than men. Since females make up only 20% of the Twitch user base, this indicates a potential lost market share that could be expanded.

With the current iteration of the tool, we are designing and testing a female-centered gameplay stream overlay. The goal of the project is to design an aesthetic overlay with biometric data that increases the spectators’ empathetic experience. If you would like to participate in a study related to this research, please click here.

Selected Publications

  • Robinson, R., Isbister, K. and Rubin, Z. 2016. All the Feels: Introducing Biometric Data to Online Gameplay Streams. In Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts (CHI PLAY Companion '16). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 261-267. doi: 10.1145/2968120.2987732