Katherine Isbister recognized as a distinguished scientist by ACM

Katherine Isbister recognized as a distinguished scientist by ACM

Katherine Isbister is among the 45 scientists, educators, and engineers that the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) has recognized this year as distinguished members for their contributions to the field of computing.

“The contributions of our Distinguished Members lead to breakthroughs that improve our lives, advance the frontiers of scientific discovery, and boost economic development,” explains ACM President Vicki L. Hanson for the official announcement (read the full text here).

Katherine Isbister invited to the PARC Forum talk series

Katherine Isbister invited to the PARC Forum talk series:

On December the 15th, Katherine was an invited speaker at PARC Forum. She presented research games created in her lab that explore how to enhance social connection through technological augmentation during a talk titled: “Connecting through Play: Tech to Augment In-Person Interaction.”  More information about this event here.

Raquel presented her work in progress at CHI Play’16

Raquel presented her work in progress at CHI Play’16

This past October, Raquel attended CHI Play 2016 where she presented a work in progress called “All the Feels: Introducing Biometric Data to Online Gameplay Streams” which can be found in the ACM library hereHer research focuses on seeing how exposing gameplay streamers’ emotions can enhance the spectator experience. To explore this, she created a tool which she calls “All the Feels”, which displays heart rate, GSR (galvanic skin response), and emotional information to stream spectators through use of a commercially available wearable device and facial recognition technology.

In her paper, she discusses the initial prototype of the tool and presents results of a preliminary study with stream watchers and streamers to assess the potential of this novel addition to gameplay. See Raquel’s poster here.

Yamove! journal paper

Check out the journal article of Yamove! A movement synchrony game that choreographs social interaction

By Katherine, Elena, and other colleagues at NYU and Babycastles. Published by the journal of Human Technologies and accessible here.